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Capture the style of "The Great Gatsby" with an Art Deco staircase

Posted by Amber Burkhart at

Set during the height of the roaring 20s, "The Great Gatsby" tells the tale of an enigmatic titular character, with detailed descriptions of distracting parties and other staples of life in the fictional East Egg and West Egg during the Jazz Age. The classic novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald has long been a part of the American canon, and is treasured by many generations. 

Perhaps that's why so many film makers have eagerly adapted the work into film, the most recent being the outlandish Australian director, Baz Luhrmann. Bringing the incredible parties and showstopping houses to life seemed the dream project for the filmmaker, whose other works include "Moulin Rouge!" and the 1996 interpretation of "Romeo + Juliet."

Because creating the world of Gatsby was such a major undertaking, the director and his wife, production designer Catherine Martin, have given a number of interviews on both the research that the project required, as well as the efforts required to rebuild such an ornate world for the camera. 

This has created a major buzz surrounding the movie, spreading into home design and fashion alike. Certainly the pinnacle of this larger-than-life style is Gatsby's house, modeled after Long Island's Oheka Castle. Inside you'll find a sweeping grand staircase that commands much of the attention during the incredible party scenes that take place inside. 

Even if building such a grand staircase isn't in the cards for you right now, it's possible to incorporate certain elements - like the wrought iron balusters and smooth wooden handrails that were typical of this Art Deco style. Add a lavish chandelier, and you're on your way to Gatsby's world. 


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